A 3-night stand on your nightstand?

wierd flex!

“I listen to two different audio books at 3x speed while reading a third.”

Ok, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but tell me you’ve seen it.

The “100 books in a year” flex.

It’s a popular goal among the online business community.

And it kinda makes sense?

Books = knowledge, so more books = more knowledge, and 2 per week = fast.

Problem is, consumption of information is not the same thing as understanding, integration, synthesis, and implementation of that information.

Two books per week guarantees a shallow, surface-level relationship with each one.

A 3-night stand on your nightstand.

And why? To check a box? A hundred of them?

A very wise friend of mine only reads a handful of books per year, and most of them are books he’s already read 5 or 6 times.

I get it, though.

We want to level up, and we are looking for the cheat code.

But allowing 100,000 words to enter your eyeballs does nothing, unless you also account and allow for processing time.

Ever play a game on an underpowered PC?

If so, you’ve experienced lag.

There’s too much information coming in per unit of time.

The processor can’t keep up.

The result is a choppy, disjointed experience. Unplayable and worthless.

Why would anyone do this to themselves in real life?

Honestly, part of this is the fault of content creators.

We do not always do a great job of only delivering highly relevant information.

(I’m reading a great book about email segmentation right now…except the first 2 chapters were all about the technical underpinnings of email. Totally unnecessary for me and boring AF! I’m glad I stuck with it, though, because the rest of the book is straight fire.)

Online courses largely have the same problem.

They usually include too much information.

Which becomes overwhelming,

Forcing the student to consume it all on 2x speed, just to “get through” it.

But the students end up with only a surface-level understanding, and rarely implement anything.

Therefore, I’m designing something truly different for Zero to One.

Think “customized” + “self-paced” + “accountability.”

Basically, it will be a slightly different experience for each participant.

One that changes and adapts based on your situation and progress.

Exactly what you need, when you need it.

No more, no less.

“But Greg, how is that possible?”

Well, I’ve got it 80% figured out.

There will be data-collecting surveys and polls.

There will be different email automations triggered based on the data.

And there will be checkpoints. Specific actions that must be taken in order to continue to the next step.

Zero to One is being designed to help beginners.

Specifically, I want it to be a catalyst for people to make their first $1000 online.

Now all of my mentors have told me not to do this.

Because getting future results for people with no past results is notoriously difficult.

Dangerous, even.

But you see, I vividly remember being a beginner myself.

I am eternally grateful for the folks who helped me make the leap from 0 to 1.

And I want to see if I can offer the same kind of help to others.

Here’s the deal-

I’m opening beta tester enrollment for Zero to One later this week.

It’s not finished, and won’t be by the time it launches.

(And, I’m taking next week off completely.)

There are already 67 people on the wait list, but I’m only taking 15-20 for this beta launch.

The beta testers must be flexible, optimistic, dependable, and engaged.

I am going to build the remaining 20% of the program around them, and their active feedback is a requirement to help me do this.

In the past, my custom programs have cost $1k, $3k, even $5k per participant.

But this is meant for beginners, remember?

So against the advice of my mentors yet again, I am going to keep the price under $100.

Yes. $100 for something more like a private tutor than a university lecture hall.

If you like the way this sounds, you can fill out the beta test application here.

This is the last you’ll hear about this launch unless you fill out the application.

Have a great week,

Greg

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